Become a
Yarn Nation VIP! FREE!

__________


Join over 24,000 New Stitch VIPs
and Receive:

            • Daily or Weekly email updates of all our FREE tutorials
            • Giveaways and contests just for members
            • Free LIVE online workshops
            • Special discounts on classes, ebooks, and patterns

            Simply click the button below to become a FREE VIP member today!

            GET SIGNED UP!
Recommend on Google

How to Knit The Fisherman’s Rib Stitch

How to Knit the Fisherman's Rib Stitch

This video knitting tutorial will help you learn how to knit the Fisherman’s Rib Stitch. This is a reversible pattern that creates a thick fabric with lots of volume and horizontal stretch. It is a great stitch for scarves, hats, and sweaters. It is similar to the Brioche stitch but has a slightly different look.
Also known as: shakers rib.

Do you knit left handed? Click here for the left handed verson!



Skill: Beginner
Cast On: Multiples of 2 + 1

For this pattern you will need to know the following techniques:
Knit – k
Purl – p
Knit One Below – k1b

Pattern Instructions:

Row 1: K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end.

Row 2: P1, *k1b, p1* rep from * to end.

Row 3: K1, *p1, k1b; rep from * to last two sts, p1, k1.

Repeat rows 2 & 3 until you have reached your desired length.

After a few repeats your pattern should look like this:
Example of the Fisherman’s Rib Stitch – Reversible (click for larger)
Example of the Fisherman's Rib Stitch {Reversible}

Become a Yarn Nation VIP! FREE!

_________________________


Join over 24,000 New Stitch VIPs and Receive:

  • Daily or Weekly email updates of all our FREE tutorials
  • Giveaways and contests just for members
  • Free LIVE online workshops
  • Special discounts on classes, ebooks, and patterns

Simply click the button below to become a FREE VIP member today!

GET SIGNED UP!

USA 

Comments

  1. Elise H

    February 16, 2011

    So nice to have met you both on Friday night at Trumpet Hill. This was the first chance I have had to see your site and it is truly wonderful. I am sure you are now getting ready to begin knitting a lacey sock!! All the best to you both.

  2. Johnny Vasquez

    February 16, 2011

    Thanks! It was very nice getting to meet you as well! I'm glad you like the site. Be sure to tell your friends! We're going to have a contest that starts this weekend and I'll be giving an update about my sock knitting progress.

  3. ladydi265@charter.net

    January 13, 2013

    I have joined your site about 2 weeks ago and just love it. I am going to be forwarding your site over to the ladies I usually knit with once a week. I love how you explain the stitches on utube. So much easier to follow then other sites. I will be going in for knee surgery in a few weeks and will be able to do more stitching. Not that I am complaining,lol. Thanks again for such a nice place to come too. Diana, MI

  4. Caroline Shank

    February 26, 2013

    Would it be possible to send me the pattern for circular knitting? I knit a lot of chemo caps and this ribbing is very nice,. I also knit arm warmers for dialysis patients. Plus scarves and mittens.
    I do get confused on how to redo the patterns for circular knitting.
    I did email before and got a response but just was hoping you could do some tutorials on this
    Thanks.
    Caroline Shank
    Brandon FL
    Also Thank you for all the work you put into these tutorials. I have learned so much

    • Lacie Vasquez

      July 17, 2013

      Hi Caroline,

      We aren’t doing tutorials in the round just yet (but that is in the works!). Until then here is a link to a pattern on purl bee that uses fisherman’s rib in the round. I hope it will be helpful to you.

      Happy knitting!

  5. Rachel

    March 5, 2013

    When you did the fisherman’s rib that was just a foundation row of knit stitchses and the rest of the rows were alternating between P and KB, did you knit the foundation row on the wrong side or the right side? Also, would KTBL keep stockinet from curling?

    • Johnny Vasquez

      March 5, 2013

      The instructions in this post have a foundation row on k1, p1.

      Where in the pattern are you doing KTBL?

      • Rachel

        March 6, 2013

        The KTBL is for a seperate pattern. The fisherman’s rib stitch i was talking about was the one where you also did a post on how to do it left handed.

        • Johnny Vasquez

          March 6, 2013

          Ahh ok. For a selvedge edge, you would slip the first stitch in pattern, then k or p tbl on the last stitch in pattern. It won’t stop stockinette from curling entirely but it should help.

          For the left handed version, yes, the first row is just a foundation row.

          • Rachel

            March 6, 2013

            I’m talking about stockinette with the entire row knit as ktbl. I want to see what would happen if I knit a blanket as a 2 row reapeat of ktbl all stitches for the first row and purl all stitchees for the second row.

            P.S Is the foundation row for the fishermans rib stitch on the wrong side or the right side?

          • Johnny Vasquez

            March 7, 2013

            That creates a fabric called twisted stockinette, which I believe will still curl some.

            I don’t think it really matters for the fishermans rib. The pattern is reversible and the foundation row is basically unseen.

  6. wendy lin

    April 12, 2013

    On your instructions it says to cast on in multiples of 2, but when I watched the video, it said to CO in multiples of 2 + 1. I was wondering which is correct? Thanks

    • Johnny Vasquez

      April 15, 2013

      Either will work. If you add one stitch at the end it will make the ribbing symmetrical so you start and end with the same stitch. But I will adjust the written instructions to make it more clear.

      • Diana G

        April 15, 2013

        Hi Johnny,
        I am kinda new to knitting and wish I understood it better when you talk about, “add multiples of 2 + 1 and what is the purpose of that? Thank you and love how you teach us to stitch on here.
        Diana

        • Johnny Vasquez

          April 16, 2013

          The quick explanation is you will cast on in multiples of 2 (4, 6, 8, 12, 20, etc.) then add 1 at the end. Does that make sense?

          • Diana G

            April 17, 2013

            Thanks Johnny that helps.