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How to Knit the Double Knit Fabric Stitch

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music in video is from demo 2008 by (Latchxe9 Swing) / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

This video knitting tutorial will help you learn how to knit in the double knit fabric stitch. This is a faux rib pattern that creates a thick, squishy fabric, perfect for warm sweaters and blankets. It should not be confused with double knitting, which is a technique often associated with color work.

Skill: Beginner

Cast On: Any odd number of stitches

For this pattern you will need to know the following techniques:

Knit – k

Purl – p

Slip Stitch – sl

With Yarn in Back – wyib

Pattern:

Row 1 (RS): K1, *sl 1 wyib, k1; rep from * to end.

Row 2: K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to end

Repeat rows 1 – 2 until you have reached your desired length.

After a few repeats your pattern should look like this:

Example of the Double Knit Fabric Stitch (Right Side)

Example of the Double Knit Fabric Stitch (Right Side)

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Comments

  1. Orincy

    December 27, 2012

    HI, Can this “Double Knit Fabric Stitch” technique be used to make a hat, and if so would I need an odd number of stitches to start or an even number of stitches?
    Thank you

    • Johnny Vasquez

      December 27, 2012

      It probably can be used for a hat. If you’re knitting it in the round then you’d need an even number of stitches.

      • Orincy

        December 29, 2012

        Thank you for the reply. I worked up a swatch and I loved how fluffy and soft it feels. Working the pattern in the round so far (seeing that I have to repeat round 1 only) It’s not as fluffy as the flat swatch. I dont know, i’ll keep working the pattern though

        • Jane

          February 27, 2013

          That is your problem, if you are only working round 1 of the pattern, then you are missing the crucial fluffy bits gained in round 2!!! You do not skip this round, but adapt it, you would probably be p1 k1 p1 instead of the k1 p1 k1 pattern but might still be k1 p1 k1 for round 2 because it’s an even number of stitches. It helps if you place a marker at the joining point so you don’t lose track of where the round begins and ends. Hope that helps you gain the fluffiness factor back!
          ~Jane

  2. Jane

    February 27, 2013

    I also have a question for the knitxpert. I am trying to make a pair of mittens top-down with this stitch but am unsure of the best method for increasing/decreasing with this double knit fabric stitch. Do you have any suggestions?
    Thanks,
    Jane

    • Johnny Vasquez

      March 2, 2013

      Hi Jane!

      I would not consider myself an expert by any means, but I would probably increase twice to stay in pattern, doing so on the row 2 repeat. Does that make sense?

  3. Gida

    March 22, 2013

    Hi Johnny, first thank you so much for sharing all this knitting knowledge
    I love this stitch. I am bumbling with decreases on a sweater I am creating for my daughter. She loves how thick and squishy this stitch is…I am having trouble finding any references to this stitch when looking for patterns or info on the net.
    I am curious to know if this stitch goes by any other name out there in the knitting realm??? :)
    Thank you again for sharing yourself and this site with the world. :D

    • Johnny Vasquez

      March 23, 2013

      I’m pretty sure it’s just a version of double knitting with one color.