Become a
Yarn Nation VIP! FREE!

__________


Join over 30,000 New Stitch VIPs
and Receive:

            • Daily or Weekly email updates of all our FREE tutorials
            • Giveaways and contests just for members
            • Free LIVE online workshops
            • Special discounts on classes, ebooks, and patterns

            Simply click the button below to become a FREE VIP member today!

            GET SIGNED UP!

How to Knit the King Charles Brocade Stitch

How to Knit the King Charles Brocade Stitch

[Editors Note: Did you know we're got a FREE class available? Yup! Sign Up for the Top 6 Sweater Making Secrets and learn how to choose a sweater pattern that will make you look fabulous. Watch Now!]

This video knitting tutorial will help you learn how to knit the king charles brocade stitch. This stitch creates a delicate woven design. The king charles brocade stitch would be great for scarves, sweaters, and blankets!

Materials Used in this Tutorial


nsad-mountain-meadow-west-marigold-h180

Mountain Meadow Wool

Our fiber factory begins in Wyoming’s rugged mountain climate.Because it is so fine, mountain merino yarn is silky soft to the touch, insulates well, and feels delightful next to your skin.We process the best fiber from the best growers in the West, transforming it into extraordinary wool products: knitting and weaving yarns; handspinner roving; quilt batts; felt and more. Made in USA.


A pair of knitting needles



Sponsored by:

MMWlogoFinal


TECHNIQUES USED IN THIS STITCH:

Knit Stitch – K
Purl Stitch-p
Knit 2 Together-k2tog
Yarn Over-yo
Pass Slip Stitch Over-psso

Skill: Intermediate
Cast On:Worked over 11 sts on a background of St st.

Pattern Instructions

  1. Row 1

    (Right Side): P2, k2tog, [k1, yo] twice, k1, sl 1, k1, psso, p2.

  2. Row 2

    K2, p7, k2.

  3. Row 3

    P2, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, p2.

  4. Row 4

    K2, p7, k2.

  5. Row 5

    P2, k1, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, p2.

  6. Row 6

    K2, p7, k2.

  7. Row 7

    P2, k2, yo, sl 1, k2tog, psso, yo, k2, p2.

  8. Row 8

    K2, p7, k2.

Repeat rows 1-8 until you reach your desired length.

Swatch Photos

Example of the King Charles Brocade Stitch. (Right Side)

Example of the King Charles Brocade Stitch. Right Side (Click for Larger Image)

Example of the King Charles Brocade Stitch. (Wrong Side)

Example of the King Charles Brocade Stitch. Wrong Side (Click for Larger Image)

Become a Yarn Nation VIP! FREE!

_________________________


Join over 30,000 New Stitch VIPs and Receive:

  • Daily or Weekly email updates of all our FREE tutorials
  • Giveaways and contests just for members
  • Free LIVE online workshops
  • Special discounts on classes, ebooks, and patterns

Simply click the button below to become a FREE VIP member today!

GET SIGNED UP!

USA 

Comments

  1. Diana lustgarte

    June 20, 2013

    I enjoy you explanation very much, the stich is very pretty but I would like to see it implemented in a garment
    I think I’m going to switch to English style it looks a lot easier

  2. Florence Lohnes

    June 21, 2013

    Hi Johnny,
    What is the protocol for sl1? Sometimes the stitch is slipped knitwise as in this video. Sometimes it is slipped purlwise with yarn in back, sometimes with yarn in front. But the instruction will just be sl1. How do we know the correct way to slip the stitch?
    Thanks,
    Florence

    • Johnny Vasquez

      July 14, 2013

      If you are going to be passing the slip stitch over, then slip it knitwise. If you are not, then slip it purlwise.

  3. Sue Joyce

    June 28, 2013

    Johnny here’s a silly question. You’ve said that all slip stitches are to be slipped purl wise. In this video (and in a few others I’ve watched ) you slip the stitch knit wise. So my question is, when is it purl wise and how do you know to slip knit wise?
    Thanks.
    Sue

    • Johnny Vasquez

      July 17, 2013

      What I have said is unless the pattern calls for it or the “stitch” is performed that way (i.e. slip slip knit), slip all stitches purlwise. A better rule is, if the stitch is going to be passed over another stitch, slip it knitwise, otherwise slip it purlwise.

      To slip knitwise, insert your needle as if to knit, but do not work the stitch. Just transfer it to your working needle.

      Make sense?

  4. Sue

    July 17, 2013

    Got it… thanks …

    We missed you and Laci while you were on vacation :)

    Glad your back
    Sue